Extension Publications for Pecans
Establishing a Pecan Orchard
(B 1314)
A well-planned, organized orchard will be more efficient, require less input and offer larger potential returns. Select the orchard location based on its soil type, drainage, water table and land topography. Straight rows in planted orchards make maintenance, irrigation and harvest easier. Tree growth and spacing requirements can also be anticipated for the early planting and subsequent orchard thinnings.
Pecan Management
(C 1174)
This circular is a calendar-based management reference for pecan production in the Southeastern U.S. It provides an easy-to-use graphical guide for management decisions regarding crop phenology, irrigation and fertilization requirements, disease, and insect and mite arthropod pest management. It also includes information on production activities including timing for planting, harvesting, and nutrient sampling. Information on bearing and non-bearing trees are provided to address the different management requirements for these orchards. Temporally precise management decisions on horticultural activities, disease suppression, and insect pest control will maximize efficiency, improve tree health, optimize crop quality and yield, and promote ecological and economic sustainability.
Pecan Trees for the Home or Backyard Orchard
(B 1348)
Pecan trees are commonly found surrounding both urban and rural dwellings throughout Georgia. They can enhance the environment and provide additional income from the sale of nuts. This publication contains comprehensive information about pecan trees for the home or backyard orchard.
Southeastern Pecan Growers' Handbook
(B 1327)
Pecan production is considered by many who practice this endeavor to be as much an art as it is a science. Growers must integrate multiple disciplines in order to be successful. This book was created with the goal of being a comprehensive reference text for pecan growers, scientists, and county agents. It addresses pecan culture and management in the southeastern United States. For more information, visit http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fruits/pecan/SPG-handbook.html
Commercial Pecan Spray Guide
(B 841)
This publication provides guidance for insect, disease, and weed control in commercial pecan orchards for 2020.
Mouse Ear of Pecan
(C 893)
Mouse ear of pecan is a growth abnormality resulting from a deficiency of nickel in the pecan tree. Only recently, the discovery was made that mouse ear indicates a severe nickel deficiency. The disorder occurs most frequently on newly transplanted trees in established orchards, but can also occur on sites where pecan has not previously been grown.
Cultural Management of Commercial Pecan Orchards
(B 1304)
In order for a commercial pecan operation to be consistently successful, the goal of the operation should be annual production of a moderate crop of high quality nuts, rather than the production of a high yield in a single given year. Culturally, there are several basic factors that will help to promote optimum profitability with a commercial pecan orchard.
Clover Management in Pecan Orchards
(B 1360)
An orchard floor provides a working surface for orchard operations and influences activities in the trees, which produce the crop. An efficient orchard floor cover does not compete heavily with trees for moisture and nutrients and is compatible with orchard insect populations. While weed competition with tree roots is significant throughout the life of the tree, in a newly planted orchard, weed competition can significantly reduce young tree survival and can stunt tree growth. Weed competition can reduce tree growth and yield, as well as promote alternate bearing in mature trees.
Budding and Grafting of Pecan
(B 1376)
Individuals who propagate trees have their own personal preferences with regard to propagation methods. As with many practices related to pecan production, timing is important for successful propagation.
Drip Irrigation in Pecans
(B 936)
Research conducted on drip-irrigated pecans in Georgia over the past several years has shown that drip irrigation is highly beneficial even in wet years. The objective of drip irrigation is to supply each plant with sufficient soil moisture to meet transpiration demands. Drip irrigation offers unique agronomic, agrotechnical and economic advantages for the efficient use of water.
See More